10-Minute Vegetable Ramen Noodles

Easy Vegetable Ramen Noodles with a spicy miso broth. Loaded with veggies, plant-based protein, and an optional soft-cooked egg, this vegetarian ramen noodle bowl is ready in just 10 minutes and is the perfect quick lunch or dinner. 

overhead photo of vegetable ramen noodle bowls on a white background

I don’t know about you, but a bowl of loaded vegetable ramen noodles is one of my go-to meals year round. 

Is there anything better than slurpable ramen noodles, a spicy, fragrant miso broth, and an endlessly customizable parade of vegetables to throw into the mix? I think not. 

I got on the ramen train after trying Roi Choi’s perfect instant ramen, which includes an egg poached right in the broth, and a slice of American cheese melted over the top. Throwing a processed cheese slice into your ramen sounds weird, right? But man oh man is it ever good.

But I am not Roi Choi, and this is Hey Nutrition Lady, so you know I’m stepping up the vegetable game hardcore, right? Even so, those gorgeous veggie-packed ramen noodles are delicious, crave-able comfort food at it’s best. 

Whether you choose a packet of instant ramen and fancy it up (totally fine) or cook up some authentic soba noodles as I have done today, this dish won’t take you much more than 10 minutes to get on the table. Make it for one, or make it for many, just make it your way. 

Let’s get going!

a plate of sliced vegetables, a bunch of ramen noodles, miso, vegetable broth, and edamame on a white background

What do I need to make vegetarian ramen?

You just need a few basics ingredients to get started and then the rest is up to you! Here’s what you’ll need:

  • Noodles –> I used some super legit soba noodles that a friend brought me from Japan, but a packet of instant ramen is totally fine too!
  • Broth –> Your favourite vegetable broth will do the trick. We’re going to fancy it up.
  • Ginger –> Pro tip: keep your ginger in the freezer and it grates like a dream.
  • Garlic –> Giving this broth some pow!
  • Miso –> I used a dark barley miso, but white miso is totally fine too.
  • Vegetables –> Pick your favourites! I used bok choy, carrots, enoki mushrooms, scallions, snow peas, and chilis. 
  • Protein –> I used a soft-boiled egg and a handful of shelled edamame. 
  • Soy sauce and Sriracha –> For extra flavour and zing. 

Do I need any special equipment?

Not particularly. Just a pot big enough to hold your noodles and broth, and otherwise you’re good to go. 

photo collage of vegetable ramen broth with miso being made in a metal pot

How do you make vegetarian ramen? 

It all starts with making the broth! Today we’re making quick and easy veggie ramen, so we’re starting with a pre-made broth and adding some zing to it. Here’s what you do:

Step 1: Heat a bit of oil in your pan. Add the scallions, ginger, and garlic, and sauté for a few minutes to soften. You’ll want to stop just as the garlic is starting to brown (see above photo).

Step 2: Add the broth. Scrape the bottom of the pan to pick up all of the flavour, and let it come to a simmer. 

Step 3: Add the miso paste. I like to put the miso in a small bowl and add a few tablespoons of broth. Whisk into a smooth slurry, and add back into the broth. 

overhead photo of soba noodles in a pot with ramen broth

Step 4: Add your noodles to the broth and cook until just softened. Note! You can also cook the noodles separately and add them to the soup at the end.

Step 5: Add the vegetables to the broth just before the noodles are finished, and let them cook until they’re softened just a bit. 

Step 6: Add your protein of choice. 

Step 7: Season your vegetable ramen with a bit of soy sauce, Sriracha, or whatever else you like. 

Step 8: Serve!

two white bowls with vegetable ramen noodles on a white background

Confession time!

Pretty food photos are fairly essential on a recipe blog, so when I made this “10-Minute Vegetable Ramen” to photograph for the blog, I cooked every vegetable individually so that I’d be able to style them on top of my soup. Don’t expect your ramen to look like this! 

When I make it  just to chow down on at home, I find bite-sized veggies are easier to eat and quicker cooking. If I hadn’t of been taking photos I would have chopped all of the veg up like so.

Can I use different veggies?

Yes! You do you. I also love snow peas, baby corn, broccoli florets, spinach leaves, and bean sprouts tossed in with the hot broth. Use what you have on hand and what you like and you can’t go wrong. 

How do you cook the egg?

I did a six-minute soft-boiled egg, which I cooked in a separate pot alongside the ramen. It’s an extra dish to wash, yes, but it doesn’t add to your cooking time whatsoever.

For me the step of soft-cooking the egg separately is fully worth it for getting the perfect (to me) egg texture of a well-cooked white and a medium-soft yolk.

Can I make vegan ramen?

You sure can! Just leave out the egg and it’s vegan all the way. 

vegetable ramen noodles topped with an egg and with chopsticks on the side

Can you make ramen in advance?

Once the noodles hit the broth you’ve got a fairly limited window before they start to get mushy, so I don’t recommend making the ramen bowls in advance. However, you can certainly prep all of the components in advance to make things extra quick.

For example, if you had the veggies pre-chopped, the egg pre-cooked (stop the cooking in an ice bath so it doesn’t over cook), and the broth ready to go, all you need to do is heat it up and add the noodles. You can even pre-cook the noodles, drain, rinse in cold water, and toss in a bit of sesame oil so they don’t get too clumpy. 

Hey Nutrition Lady, what’s the deal with bok choy?

Bok choy, also known as pak choy, is a member of the brassica family which also includes broccoli, collard greens, and kale. Pak choy is host to a number of antioxidant nutrients including vitamin C, carotenoids (a pre-curser to vitamin A), manganese, and zinc, as well as a range of phytonutrients.

There are also many anti-inflammatory nutrients in pak choy, including the omega-3 fatty acid alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) and vitamin K. Pak choy, like other cruciferous vegetables, are a good source of glucosinolates – unique sulfur-containing compounds that have been shown to have cancer-protective properties. It’s also a good source of potassium, folate, vitamin B6, calcium, iron, vitamin B2, phosphorus, and dietary fiber.

overhead photo with two white bowls of vegetable ramen noodles with sriracha on the side

Other recipes you might enjoy:

Miso Veggie Soup in a Jar
Vegan Poké Bowls
Vegan Rice Noodle Bowls
Black Bean Noodle Bowls with Spicy Sesame Sauce

vegetable ramen noodles on a white background
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5 from 3 votes

10-Minute Vegetable Ramen Noodles

Easy Vegetable Ramen Noodles with a spicy miso broth. Loaded with veggies, plant-based protein, and an optional soft-cooked egg, this vegetarian ramen noodle bowl is ready in just 10 minutes and is the perfect quick lunch or dinner. 
Course Main Course, Soup
Cuisine Asian
Keyword Ramen Noodles, Vegetable Ramen
Prep Time 5 minutes
Cook Time 10 minutes
Total Time 15 minutes
Servings 1
Calories 523kcal
Author Katie Trant

Ingredients

  • 1 tsp sesame oil
  • 1 Tbsp fresh ginger grated
  • 1 clove garlic minced
  • 1 scallion sliced
  • 2 cups vegetable broth
  • 1 Tbsp miso paste
  • 2 oz soba noodles or one "cake" of instant ramen noodles
  • 1/2-1 bunch bok choy chopped into bite-sized pieces
  • 1/2 medium carrot shredded
  • 1/2 cup shelled edamame
  • 1/4 cup cilantro chopped
  • 1/4-1/2 a red chile sliced
  • 1 large soft-boiled egg optional
  • black sesame seeds for garnish

Instructions

  • Heat a medium-sized saucepan over medium high heat. Add 1 tsp sesame oil, the grated ginger, crushed garlic, and scallions. Sauté until vegetables are soft and just beginning to brown.
  • Add the vegetable broth and use a spoon to scrape any bits from the bottom of the pot.
  • Place the miso paste in a small bowl and add a few tablespoons of broth to make a slurry. Then, add this mixture back into the broth.
  • Add the noodles, and let cook for 3-4 minutes, stirring to break up the noodles.
  • When the noodles have softened most of the way, add the vegetables. Allow the ramen to simmer for another couple of minutes, and then transfer to a bowl.
  • Garnish with sliced scallions, cilantro, and a sprinkle of black sesame seeds. Season with soy sauce and / or Sriracha.
  • Serve immediately.

Notes

  • Nutrition values are an estimate only
  • Once the noodles hit the broth you've got a fairly limited window before they start to get mushy, so I don't recommend making the ramen bowls in advance. However, you can certainly prep all of the components in advance to make things extra quick.
  • For example, if you had the veggies pre-chopped, the egg pre-cooked (stop the cooking in an ice bath so it doesn't over cook), and the broth ready to go, all you need to do is heat it up and add the noodles. You can even pre-cook the noodles, drain, rinse in cold water, and toss in a bit of sesame oil so they don't get too clumpy. 

Nutrition

Calories: 523kcal | Carbohydrates: 76g | Protein: 31g | Fat: 15g | Saturated Fat: 3g | Cholesterol: 164mg | Sodium: 3329mg | Potassium: 1733mg | Fiber: 10g | Sugar: 14g | Vitamin A: 25489IU | Vitamin C: 200mg | Calcium: 544mg | Iron: 8mg

This recipe was originally published May 22, 2017. It was retested, rephotographed, and last updated on April 2, 2020.

Comments

  1. Rebecca says

    This is a hit with my whole family and such a quick dinner. Thank you. I add some shiitake and then some fried tempeh strips on top at the end too.

  2. Pat says

    Hi, great recipe however although I haven’t checked the ingredients lately I’m wondering what’s in the broth package. I seem to be sensitive to a lot of added flavour enhancers, etc.

    • Katie Trant says

      It would vary from brand to brand. I recommend you read the labels carefully and find a ramen brand that doesn’t contain the ingredients you’re sensitive to. Or, leave the flavour packet out and replace with veggie broth, miso broth, etc.

    • Katie Trant says

      I live in Sweden so I’m assuming that my ramen brand isn’t local to you…it’s called Taste of Asia and it’s surely terribly inauthentic. I recommend hitting your local Asian market and trying a few different kinds until you find one you like.

  3. kellie@foodtoglow says

    Fancied up ramen is the only way to eat it, I think. I’m not sure I could do just the bowl of noodles and packets of seasoning (too stodgy). I scrabble about doing a fridge clear out and add any old vegetable for ramen days. Ones I”m sure have never been seen in Asia 😉 I haven’t had quite the freezer drama that you have had but if it doesn’t happen I will a) rally the work troops to eat my freezer; b) fancy up my ramen! I’m with you about eggs. They need a little more cooking than introduced to broth for me to eat it. But i Love eggs. Fasting today so I really shouldn’t be commenting on food blogs such as yours! Painful!

  4. Kelsie | the itsy-bitsy kitchen says

    OK, instant ramen is one of my guilty pleasures. How have I never thought to add veggies before? What have I been doing my whole life? This sounds awesome! And with added veggies I don’t have to be quite so guilty when I eat it :). That’s my kind of dinner!

      • keith H says

        If you look at Japan and Italy, both countries support very large populations of old folk, yet noodles are a major staple in both places. Bread, after all, is ground-up cereal and water, just like the noodle. Could it be overly large portion sizes and rich, meat-laden sauces that make many see this humble ingredient as intrinsically ‘unhealthy’?

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