Spelt Pizza Dough

Learn how to make Spelt Pizza Dough from scratch! Homemade pizza is easy to make with just a few simple ingredients like wholegrain flour, yeast, water, and salt. I’ll also show you how to batch cook and freeze your pizza bottoms to make pizza night a breeze!

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four balls of spelt pizza dough on a marble cutting board

I’ve been making homemade pizza for almost as long as I can remember. We used to make dough and press it into a pan to bake in the oven. Then, we graduated to blind baking the crust for a bit to get it crispier.

That lead to a pizza stone, which lead to my dad and I making wooden pizza peels together because I didn’t like the rinky dink one the stone came with. And then, finally, we graduated to using a pizza steel, which, if you’re into making homemade pizza, I HIGHLY recommend. 

We used to have pizza nights every now and then, which were always pretty special occasions, but then it somehow evolved into a weekly pizza night, which is when I started making spelt flour pizza dough. I figured if we were going to be making pizza that regularly, I may as well sneak some whole grains into my family.

And you know what? It took my husband a full month to notice.  

Trust me when I say that pizza is sacred to me, and I wouldn’t be trying to pawn some sawdust-stuffed hippy food pizza crust off on you unless it was really really good. 

If you’re intimidated by handling yeast doughs, don’t be. I’ll talk you through it step by step below; we’re in this together! If you’re really just looking for something quick and easy and can’t be bothered making the dough, I feel you. Try my quick and easy Naan Bread Pizza instead!

spelt flour, all purpose flour, salt, olive oil, honey, herbs, and fresh yeast on a grey background

What do I need to make spelt pizza dough?

Just a few simple ingredients is all you need to get going on your homemade pizza dough. Here’s what you’ll need:

  • Spelt flour –> I use wholegrain spelt four.
  • Flour –> I use high-gluten bread flour, but all-purpose is likely find as well (we’ll discuss flour types below).
  • Yeast –> Fresh yeast is more commonly found where I live, but dried yeast is fine as well.
  • Salt –> I like using Herbamare herb salt in my pizza dough.
  • Herbs –> I add a bit of dried basil and oregano.
  • Oil –> Just a bit of olive oil will do.

Equipment needed:

  • All you really need for making homemade pizza dough is a bowl and a spoon, although do I love my Kitchen Aid Mixer for doing the kneading. 
  • Nice, but not necessary, I love proofing my dough in the Instant Pot on the Yogurt setting. Note – you need a glass lid with a vent for this.
  • A rolling pin for rolling out your dough.
  • Baking sheet, pizza stone, or pizza steel for baking your pizza.

photo collage of pizza dough being made in a metal bowl

How do you make spelt flour pizza dough?

You’ll find instructions in the printable recipe card below, but I’ll walk you through it step by step here. So let’s get started!

Step 1: Combine lukewarm water, yeast, and honey in a large bowl. Let it stand for about 10 minutes, until the top of the water is foamy. Note – I’m using fresh yeast in these photos, which doesn’t get as foamy looking as active dried or instant yeast. 

Step 2: Add the spelt flour, all-purpose flour, salt, herbs, and olive oil to the bowl. Mix well with a wooden spoon, or using the dough hook of your stand mixer. 

Step 3: Knead your dough. You can either do this by hand, or with a stand mixer if you have one. Once the flour is all mixed into the dough, watch it to see if you need to add a bit more flour. 

spelt pizza dough being mixed in a kitchen aid mixer

If you’re kneading by hand, my rule is that if I can keep it moving on the counter top without it sticking to the counter or my hands, it doesn’t need more flour. If it’s sticking while moving, then add more flour, bit by bit. 

If you’re kneading in a stand mixer, if the dough is sticking to the sides of the bowl while the mixer is running, you need to add more flour, bit by bit. 

It’s important to only add extra flour if the dough is sticking while it’s moving. It will always stick to the bowl, counter top, or hands, if you stop moving and let it stand still, but you should get to a point where it becomes smooth enough that it does not stick while on the move. That’s when your dough is done. 

Avoid adding too much extra flour as this will yield a tougher dough. 

Step 4: Let your dough rise. 

Pour a bit of oil into a large bowl, and put the ball of dough in there. Roll the dough around in the oil so it’s well coated. Cover with a damp kitchen towel or a glass lid, and let rise until the dough has doubled in size – about 30 minutes.

If you have an Instant Pot, I LOVE proofing my dough using the yogurt setting. It keeps the dough the perfect temperature, and rises in about half the time. 

spelt pizza dough proofing in an instant pot

Note – this is a double batch of dough which is why it comes right up to the top

Step 5: Once the dough has doubled, punch it down! I usually get my kids to do this and make them yell, “Give me my money! Give me my money!” while they’re punching the dough. 

Step 6: Divide the dough into three equal sized balls for three thin-crust pizzas. Place a damp kitchen towel over the dough that you’re not working with. 

a ball of pizza dough on a marble cutting board with a wooden rolling pin to the side

Step 7: Use a wooden rolling pin to roll your dough to the desired thinness. I usually go quite thin, like around 1/4-1/2 inch thick. 

Step 8: At this point you can either press the dough into a baking pan (grease well, or scatter with cornmeal to prevent sticking) or transfer to a pizza peel if you’re using a baking steel or pizza stone. 

Regardless of what method I’m using to cook my dough, I like to cook it bare naked (no toppings) for a few minutes. If you’re baking your pizza in a pan this will give you a crispier bottom. If you’re using a peel, it will make it way easier to slide the pizza in and out of the oven once the toppings are on.

Step 9: Now add your favourite toppings, and bake! I love using these Semi-Dried Tomatoes on my pizza, a really good pizza sauce (I sometimes use this Instant Pot Pasta Sauce as the base) and fresh basil. Yum yum. 

photo collage of spelt pizza dough rolled out on a wooden peel

Here’s the other thing about having a weekly pizza night: we have two small kids, and let me tell you, being elbow deep in sticky pizza dough while the small folk are trying to pull your pants down is not cool. 

So my solution? I batch cook my pizza bottoms. (Related: Batch Cooking For Beginners)

Yup, every few weeks I whip up a double or triple batch of my spelt pizza dough when I’ve got a quiet house. Then I roll them out, fire them into the oven, and cook each bottom for just a few minutes. I pull them out, cool on a wire rack, and then freeze a stack of par-cooked pizza bottoms. 

That way when pizza night rolls around I can relax, let whoever wants to make the pizza be in charge, and I don’t have to worry about flour and dough being all over the place at the end of the night. It’s like buying a store-bought pizza bottom, but homemade, wholegrain, and delicious. 

a stack of pizza bottoms on a wire rack

What kind of flour is best for making pizza?

Purists will swear by the tipo 00 flour for making pizza, but I think when you’re making wholegrain pizza crusts it’s not worth mixing it in. I prefer to use a high-gluten bread flour when I’m mixing it 50/50 with wholegrain flour, because I think it gives the crust a better structure overall. 

Also, where I live (in Sweden), all-purpose flour is quite low in gluten (only about 8%) compared to all-purpose flour in Canada (13%) or the US (11%) so I find the bread flour gives me the results I’m used to.          

Can I use 100% spelt flour?

I have tested various combinations, and I think that for taste, texture, and health, you get the best bang for your buck when you use 50% spelt flour and 50% all-purpose. You can of course play around with this yourself and figure out what ratio works best for your personal tastes. 

Can I use a different kind of wholegrain flour?

I have tried this recipe with spelt, whole wheat, and wholegrain rye flour with good results. You can also make this recipe with 100% all-purpose flour if you prefer. 

If you’re after a 100% whole wheat pizza crust, I’ll direct you to this recipe from Sustainable Cooks which uses vital wheat gluten to get extra spring in the dough. 

Can you freeze pizza dough?

You sure can! Although I personally prefer to freeze par-cooked pizza bottoms for ease of use, you can totally freeze dough to use in the future as well. 

After the dough rises, punch it down and divide into balls. Wrap each ball tightly in plastic wrap, and then pop the dough balls into a freezer bag. When you’re ready to use, let the pizza dough thaw on the counter and allow it to rise again before rolling it out. 

cheese and tomato pizza on a marble background

Other recipes you might enjoy:

Spicy Kale Lasagna with Cottage Cheese 
Vegetarian Ravioli Bake
Tempeh Tacos

four balls of spelt pizza dough on a marble cutting board
Print Pin
5 from 5 votes

Spelt Pizza Dough

Learn how to make Spelt Pizza Dough from scratch! Homemade pizza is easy to make with just a few simple ingredients like wholegrain flour, yeast, water, and salt. I'll also show you how to batch cook and freeze your pizza bottoms to make pizza night a breeze!
Course Main Course
Cuisine American, Italian
Keyword Pizza Dough, Spelt Flour Cookie
Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 15 minutes
Rising time 1 hour
Total Time 1 hour 25 minutes
Servings 3 pizzas
Calories 523kcal
Author Katie Trant

Ingredients

  • 1.5 cups lukewarm water
  • 1 Tbsp active dried yeast or 50g fresh yeast
  • 1 tsp honey or sugar
  • 1.5 cups wholegrain spelt flour
  • 1.5 cups all purpose or bread flour plus more for dusting
  • 1 tsp salt I use herb salt
  • 1 tsp dried basil
  • 1 tsp dried oregano
  • 1 Tbsp olive oil

Instructions

  • Combine lukewarm water, yeast, and honey in a large bowl. Let it stand for about 10 minutes, until the top of the water is foamy.
  • Add the spelt flour, all-purpose flour, salt, herbs, and olive oil to the bowl. Mix well with a wooden spoon, or using the dough hook of your mixer. 
  • Knead your dough for about 10 minutes. You can either do this by hand, or with a stand mixer if you have one. Once the flour is all mixed into the dough, watch it to see if you need to add a bit more flour (see notes below)
  • Once the dough is smooth, add a bit of oil to a large bowl and place the dough into the bowl. Roll the dough around to coat in oil. Cover with a damp kitchen towel or glass lid, all let rise until doubled in size - about one hour. If you have an Instant Pot, use it on the Yogurt setting for a faster rise.
  • Once the dough has doubled, punch down, and divide into three balls.
  • Liberally sprinkle your working surface with flour, and use a wooden rolling pin to roll the dough to the desired thinness.
  • Press the dough into a pan sprinkled with cornmeal, or transfer to a pizza peel if you're using a pizza stone or baking steel.

To bake the pizza

  • Pre-heat your oven. If you're using a stone or a steel, I crank my oven as hot as it will go and like to pre-heat it for at last and hour. If you're using a baking pan, pre-heat to 450°F / 225°C.
  • Bake the dough without any toppings for a couple of minutes to ensure a crisp bottom. Remove from the oven, top with your favourite toppings, and bake until cheese is bubbly and crust is crispy.

Notes

  • Nutrition values are an estimate only, and are for one entire pizza bottom.
  • Notes on kneading the dough: If you're kneading by hand, my rule is that if I can keep it moving on the counter top without it sticking to the counter or my hands, it doesn't need more flour. If it's sticking while moving, then add more flour, bit by bit. 
    If you're kneading in a stand mixer, if the dough is sticking to the sides of the bowl while the mixer is running, you need to add more flour, bit by bit. 
    It's important to only add extra flour if the dough is sticking while it's moving. It will always stick to the bowl, counter top, or hands, if you stop moving and let it stand still, but you should get to a point where it becomes smooth enough that it does not stick while on the move. That's when your dough is done. 
    Avoid adding too much extra flour as this will yield a tougher dough.   

Nutrition

Calories: 523kcal | Carbohydrates: 95g | Protein: 15g | Fat: 7g | Saturated Fat: 1g | Sodium: 780mg | Potassium: 80mg | Fiber: 10g | Sugar: 2g | Calcium: 27mg | Iron: 6mg

 

Comments

  1. Emelie says

    I’ve never had good results with yeasted breads, until now! This recipe was so easy to follow, and it turned out great. Looking forward to making this again! And other breads too! Thanks Katie!

  2. Malin says

    Ended up making this with three kinds of flour, cause it’s what I had, and it was so good! Also froze a couple for next week. Highly recommend.

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